240

30 07 2010

Easy one.

Id title and the narrator

Answer = This movie is Dale, about Dale Earnhardt Sr, and it was narrated by Paul Newman. Incidentally, this happens to be his last movie.

The Weekly Champion for this week is Harish Krishna! Kudos! 🙂

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239

30 07 2010

Id the comic

Answer = Roy of the Rovers, a British comic strip created by Frank S. Pepper, is about the life and exploits of a fictional footballer named Roy Race, who played for Melchester Rovers.





238

30 07 2010

Logo of?

Answer = Amateur Kabaddi Federation of India. Slightly crappy question, yeah. Adjust please





237

28 07 2010

If you were on a court like this, what sport would you be playing?

(Question toned down from a high funda one by Mario)

Answer = Slamball!





236

28 07 2010

Today’s question comes from Balaji.

Id this guy, and what record does he hold wrt long-distance running?

Answer = Shizo Kanakuri. Cracked only by Harish Krishna. Have nothing else to add to his answer. Read his comment for a detailed answer





235

23 07 2010

Author please

Answer = Albert Spalding, founder of Spalding sporting goods company.

In 1905, after Henry Chadwick wrote an article saying that baseball grew from the British sports of cricket and rounders, Spalding called for a commission to find out the real source of baseball. The commission called for citizens who knew anything about the founding of baseball to send in letters. After three years of searching, on December 30, 1907, Spalding received a letter that (erroneously) declared baseball to be the invention of Abner Doubleday. The commission, though, was biased, as Spalding would appoint anyone to the commission if they believed the sport was somewhat related to the english sport of rounders. Just before the commission, in a letter to sportswriter Tim Murnane, Spalding noted, “Our good old American game of baseball must have an American Dad.” The project, later called the Mills Commission, concluded that “Base Ball had its origins in the United States” and “the first scheme for playing baseball, according to the best evidence available to date, was devised by Abner Doubleday at Cooperstown, N.Y., in 1839.” Receiving the archives of Henry Chadwick in 1908, Spalding combined these records with his own memories (and biases) to write America’s National Game (published 1911) which, despite its flaws, was probably the first scholarly account of the history of baseball.

And the Winners of week 37 are Harish Krishna and Balaji! Congrats! 🙂





234

22 07 2010

Question courtesy : Balaji

What protective measure was he the first to employ?

(Be very specific)

Answer = This is Doug Allison, of the Cincinnati Red Stockings. He is the earliest known player to use a glove, when he donned buckskin mittens to protect his hands in 1870.

Went uncracked. Tempted to give points to Nooney for his innovative answer!